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Taylor

Taylor
May 14, 2013

Aviom Monitoring System at the Greater Travelers Rest Baptist Church

The second video in our series showcasing practical applications of the Aviom Personal Monitor Mixing System takes us to Decatur, Georgia and the beautiful Greater Travelers Rest Baptist Church. Amandla Lassiter (a.k.a. Dole) is the chief audio engineer for the church and was kind enough to walk us through how he integrates the Aviom system into his work flow. Dole goes over the highlights of this integration in the video above, but it’s worth discussing more specifically how he, and his five piece band, utilize the Aviom system.

Each member of the band has their own Aviom A-16 II Personal Mixer so they can control each individual channel they want to monitor. As Dole notes in the video, the things they want adjusted in terms of EQ are done during sound check. Once that is to the bands liking, it’s just a matter of them mixing themselves in terms of …

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Taylor

Taylor
May 1, 2013

Aviom Monitoring System at the Alliance Theatre

For this video we took a trip to the Woodruff Arts Center in Atlanta, GA. The Woodruff Arts Center is home to the High Museum of Art, the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra, and the Alliance Theatre. It’s a beautiful facility located at the cusp of the heart of downtown Atlanta (in case you are ever in the area and looking for great music, art, and theater). For our purposes we visited the Alliance Theatre to take a look at how they have integrated the Aviom Personal Monitor Mixing System into their live sound installations.

The Alliance Theatre was hosting a production of Zorro which included lots of choreographed acrobatics and full use of the theater space. The orchestra members for this production were not placed in the traditional orchestra pit, but were instead lifted onto the right and left sides of the stage with a drummer placed below the stage (for obvious noise …

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Taylor

Taylor
December 10, 2012

Aviom Personal Monitor Mixing System Overview

One professional relationship that has been consistently strained throughout the years has been between a band and the engineer controlling their monitor mix. It seems like no matter how many shows I’ve played or how many I’ve been in the audience for, I have always seen the classic point to a microphone, guitar, or monitor with a thumbs up to signal a lack of volume. The drummer will point his stick to the singer and then point it up and then make a stink face about how the mix is still inadequate. Often times the monitor mix is just fine during soundcheck and then once bodies are packed into the venue and the band gets that sudden adrenaline rush, that mix is going to be very different than what was initially dialed in. Unfortunately the brunt of the complaining falls on the shoulders of the engineer who cannot hear the …