NEWS
UniqueSquared

UniqueSquared
August 21, 2013

Clipping and limiting explained

Clipping audio is something that many of us have dealt with when we first started downloading music years ago.  Before mp3s were actually available in a quality format, they were often rips of other sources, some of them being CDs, and some of them being from radio and live performances.  Needless to say, when the source of the audio is bad, you cannot expect the mp3 to be any better.  You may have noticed when volumes go too high out of their range, leading to awful noises and artifacts in the songs.  This is known as clipping.  In this case, it the name suggests exactly what the audio is doing.

See analog audio does not share the same range as digital audio, so when something goes out of the range of recording – it simply disappears.  What this translates to in audio are quick clicking and clipping noise that can …

NEWS
UniqueSquared

UniqueSquared
June 22, 2013

Dithering – Adding “Good Noise”

Visual artist who use computer programs to aid their artwork are aware of how different digital images are from their analog cousins.  A digital image is not actually the same image of what it was taken from – it is more like a representation of the picture that has been translated a bit at a time.  Knowing this fact, artists can use this to their advantage.  They can increase or decrease the number of bits in a picture, and they can literally keep the same image while needing to use less information.  In audio, the analogy works as well, since digital audio is a mere translation or representation of analog audio.

Audio dithering, like visual dithering, can either add or subtract to the overall feel or effect of the song.  While sample rates are pretty common across the board in music making, the depth or each bit can be changed …