NEWS
UniqueSquared

UniqueSquared
July 25, 2013

How Are You Coping With iTunes 11?

The not so recent iTunes update to version 11 received praise from many, but also had users holding on to their older versions.  One of the biggest changes to the visual navigation and layout itself is the use of visuals.  Instead of simply listing the song name and title on the front page, that page is used to show a grid of the album art from each song.  It was meant to be a new way of browsing, which lets you use picture associations instead of just written words.  Some may find this frustrating, and would rather prefer lists of music over grids of songs – but most will get over their troubles sooner or later.

I don’t use iTunes, but it seems like I cannot avoid keeping it installed on my computer.  Any song on Amazon that is downloaded opens directly with iTunes, and that darn updater just keeps …

NEWS
UniqueSquared

UniqueSquared
July 3, 2013

Move My Traktor Tunes & Settings To Another Computer?

Everyone seems to have their own school of thought when it comes time to transfer songs from one computer to another.  Some will ditch any hardware and simply do it wirelessly or through an internet connection – while some do not have this option, given the amount of data they want to transmit.  Others will use a large external that is connected to computers as a virtual hub between their laptop and their desktop system.  Finally, the most common method of transferring files onto a drive for DVS use comes down to using a smaller intermediate storage device, like a small thumb USB drive.  Since the amount of information on these drives is quite large these days, the size vs. capacity is a big winning factor.

Instead of having entire libraries stored on one space, DJs sometimes transfer files over as if they were only playlists that did not need …

NEWS
UniqueSquared

UniqueSquared
July 3, 2013

Rekord Buddy — the Traktor and Rekordbox converter

Before we could store and access files digitally for DJing purposes, it had to all be done by hand.  While this seems like a monotonous task it actually had its perks, considering just how much longer it takes to mess with a tangible piece of audio.  For one, it allowed us to know our music on a much more personal level – meaning that often had to listen to entire tracks to know where our cue point would come in for a good transition to the next song.  These days, cueing records are as simple as pressing a button.  There is are plenty of spaces where you can drop a proper cue point, and it is a much better option than trying to guess where on the record you are supposed to drop your needle.

The trouble with this method is the sheer volume of music that we have to …