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paul

Paul
May 22, 2013

Ableton Live 9 + Push in a Hardware Studio

While it seemed obvious that Ableton Live 9 would power my studio as well and flexibly than its predecessor (with some improvements), there were some items back in the announcement for Ableton Live 9 and its accompanying hardware curiosity that left me with questions. As a hardware synth loving kind of a guy, my first and most immediate questions revolved around the level of integration with external instruments. In the months that have passed, I have acquired the Push controller and answered these questions for myself. Over the next few weeks, we will be doing some videos to show you how to duplicate the more interesting uses for plugins and external instruments we have been finding while working with Ableton Push, as well as digging up more ways to use Push as a tool for creative performance.

In this video, I am simply creating using my own startup template, …

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UniqueSquared

UniqueSquared
December 24, 2012

Switched On Nutcracker

If you’re in your 20’s or 30’s and you feel a little nostalgic about your past, you can always dust off (or find) an old Nintendo Entertainment System or an old Atari game, and marvel at its greatness.  Some of the old classics like Pitfall or even Zelda were extraordinary feats of mankind’s creativity that still echo through more modern games that we enjoy today.  The idea that game developers had to work with limited resources to create something so imaginative is what drives game creation to this day.  Other than the visual and programming side of things, the music was also top notch – even though they lacked the type of technology we have today as well.

Much of the music created for Nintendo games were created with 8-bit monophonic machines, yet developers were able to expand such a small tool to create digital symphonies.  That type of music …

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Taylor

Taylor
November 27, 2012

Creating Analog Sounds: Moog Minitaur and Moogerfooger Pedals

While at the Moog Sound Lab during Moogfest 2012 we got an exclusive overview of how to integrate the Moog Minitaur analog bass synthesizer with a series of Moogerfooger pedals. Amos Gaynes walked us through some of the signature sounds on the Minitaur while tweaking his pre-made sequence using the MF-102 Ring Modulator, the MF-103 12 Stage Phaser, and the MF-104M Analog Delay.

Taking advantage of analog sounds is a great way to expand your production or performance. The Moog line of analog synthesizers provide specific tonal and sonic capabilities that could take you hours or days trying to emulate digitally with software. Here are some more specific features of each of these devices:

Moog Minitaur

While on the surface the Moog Minitaur looks limited, it is actually quite expansive with the ability to load and store 100 presets within the Minitaur’s internal memory. This is something new that Moog have …

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Taylor

Taylor
November 21, 2012

Chad Hugo and the Moog Slim Phatty

Chad Hugo, along with co-producer Pharrell Williams, are easily considered among the most successful producers of all time and especially within the last few decades. Blending their own musical influences with eastern sounds and a knack for pop sensibility, Hugo along with Williams have been instrumental in crafting such mega hits as “I’m a Slave 4 U” (Britney Spears), “Hot in Herre” (Nelly), and “U Don’t Have to Call” (Usher). While most of you may be familiar with Chad Hugo as one half of super producers The Neptunes and member of the group N.E.R.D., others of you may be familiar with his current DJ duo called Missile Command which includes Daniel Biltmore. What you may not know yet about Chad Hugo is that he was asked by Moog to make sounds for their new all white re-issued Slim Phatty analog synthesizers.

Hugo pulls influences from his youth in Virginia Beach to his professional work …

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UniqueSquared

UniqueSquared
October 19, 2012

Dave Smith On Why Hardware Synths Still Matter – ‘Fun Is Extremely Important!’

Will true hardware synthesizers become a thing of the past now that we have hundreds, if not thousands of virtual synthesizers at our fingertips?  Granted, not having to plug and unplug cables from several different pieces of hardware is nice, and not having to spend thousands of dollars and antique pieces of equipment that can break at any given time is also nice – but is there something that separates a physical synth from a virtual one?

Dave Smith recently shares his view on why “hardware synths still matter”.  His first point has to do with the layout and interface of most virtual synthesizers.  Knobs, buttons, and other functions simply cannot be spaced and laid out in a way that makes sense.  Adding a goofy looking mouse and QWERTY keyboard also detracts from how a synthesizer is supposed to be used.  Obviously, he’s biased – but he makes a good …