PRO AUDIO
Matt

Matt
November 1, 2013

Native Instruments Maschine Studio Review

It’s been quite a long time since we have seen anything drastically new from the Native Instruments line of Maschine groove production controllers. Sure we got the Maschine Mikro and two new versions with the MK2 line, but these added only slight improvements to workflow and left a lot of active Maschine users (myself included) wondering if there was ever going to be anything substantially different on the horizon. Well those questions can now be answered with the latest controller in the Maschine line, the Maschine Studio.

There are tons of new features on the Maschine Studio which, in my opinion, really improve the sound design process because it gets your eyes and your hands off the computer screen and mouse and onto the actual controller. That’s not to say that this was not achievable on the Maschine MK2 or even the first Maschine, but it was not perfect. …

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UniqueSquared

UniqueSquared
August 2, 2013

A brief history of sound design technology

The history of sound goes back farther than most of us are able to recall.  History only reports what it knows about early man and what we used instruments to create music.  It doesn’t quite understand, however, how exactly music was to be developed before the era of writing and written documents.  I’m sure at an early point in our development; man was fascinated by the noises that could be created in nature.  There were water drops that could hit a pond of water to make noise, and the sound of hitting two objects against each other also made noise.  Somewhere along the lines, a brilliant person stretched the hair of an animal over a bow and was able to actually pitch the noises that were created.

Civilized man eventually learned that sound could be incorporated into other themes, such as theater and war.  Something about the nature of sound …

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UniqueSquared

UniqueSquared
May 23, 2013

8 mastering myths debunked

Producing music requires persistence along with creativity.  We may hear a few popular tracks from an artist who has produced their music at home, but we will never hear the hundreds or thousands of tracks that were never finished or brought to the mastering studio.  Artists have the difficult task of being creative and fresh, while being able to understand the technical side of their work.  But even the best producer will eventually send his songs off to a mastering engineer to improve their work before it is mixed down into a digital file.  Why would such a skilled artist go through the hassle of letting someone else alter their work?

The reason is that not every creative person has an engineering mindset and the opposite is also true.  You can be veteran DAW users, perhaps you know what almost every function does in Ableton – but this doesn’t …

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UniqueSquared

UniqueSquared
January 7, 2013

Diego Stocco – Wired For Sound

There is enough equipment available to use, that two DJs and two producers might not have one piece of gear in common.  The same song could basically be produced using a mix of software and hardware, or even no software at all.  A sparse setup is all that is required to being to make music, as long as the producer himself/herself is filled with ideas to help propel them forward.  Nowadays, many producers employ the use of a DAW because it is much easier to record and fix errors using a piece of software, than it is using recorded tracks and tapes – but the similarities can stop there.

After that their musical gear can differ greatly.  Some may prefer to use vintage analog synthesizer keyboards to create their melodies, while some may go with an analog guitar that is distorted enough to sound like something other than a guitar.  …

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UniqueSquared

UniqueSquared
October 16, 2012

Synth Secrets: How To Make Your Moog Sound Fat, Overloaded & Unstable

You know that super annoying sound you get when your microphone is too close to your speakers?  It’s one of those noises that make audiences shriek and cover their ears.  While this is typically undesirable and usually avoided at all costs, it can sometimes be useful and encouraged if you know what you’re doing.

An old trick that still has its place in the synthesizer world is similar to what was just mentioned above.  It involves feeding your output directly into your input again, creating a feedback loop.  Normally, any other instrument would be subject to the same harsh noise that you get in the microphone scenario – but with the MiniMoog, it’s controllable.…